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#1 Stern Austin Powers

Discussion in 'The Menace Files' started by Menace, May 9, 2013.

  1. Menace

    Menace Well-Known Member
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    Alright, finally forced myself to sit at my PC and start organizing all of my notes and pics that I've been collecting over the past several months of various repairs that I've done on various games. This is the first time I've ever really "blogged" anything, so forgive me if things are not clear or in order or if there are things that I have missed. I already KNOW I'm missing a number of pics which I'm kinda bumed about, but I digress... This will be a work in progress section, and I'm sure the more entries I do the better I'll get at it, and I'll have a better understanding of what pics I should be taking along the way. When I'm working on stuff the last thing I'm thinking about is what pics I should be taking for my post as I'm wrapping my head around the repair.

    Anyways, with that I've decided the first entry will be a straight forward repair that Warlock brought to me. A friend of his owns an Austin Powers that had the trough up kicker coil stop working. Scott and Walt went to diagnose, and after consulting with me about the issue they determined the coil itself was shorted and the subsequent driver board MosFET was also borked. Changing the coil out was something they could handle on their own, but asked for my assistance with the PCB repair.

    20130508_235203.jpg

    When I received the PCB I noticed that the part in question had already been removed for me, which was a nice gesture. (notice there are 2 parts missing, the one on the left is the FET for the coil and the one on the right is a transistor for an optional coin counter that is not used in the game - I had to confirm with the manual in case this needed to be addressed)

    20130508_235224.jpg

    Now when you hear people talk about board work, and how it takes a decent amount of practice before you get the hang of it (or that PCB rework is just not for everyone), this is what we're talking about... In this photo (and the one above if you had sharp eyes) you'll notice that a couple of the solder pads and associated traces have been lifted / ruined. This can happen for all kinds of different reasons, from too much heat from your iron to too little heat from your iron and pulling the part out before it's ready and so on. Unfortunately there isn't really a set amount of heat or time you should apply to a PCB when removing a part as every part and PCB is different, so it all comes down to "feel". (sorry, that's the best way I can describe it)

    20130508_235332.jpg

    You'll notice that the top and bottom pads are completely gone. The middle pad and trace have been lifted from the PCB surface. The other thing to note is the lower pad that is missing, also had 2 traces attached to it and you can just barely see whats left of one to the lower left of the hole. (the little copper strand) All of these traces will now need to be fixed with jumpers. Luckily the majority of pinball PCB's are single or dual layer (traces on the bottom, or top and bottom) which makes repairing broken traces fairly easy. In this case I can see exactly where the traces route to and will not require the schematics.

    20130509_000806.jpg

    In this pic you can see I have installed the new MosFET and tacked it in place using what's left of the original middle pad and lifted trace. I have bent the bottom leg of the FET over and soldered it to the pad where one of the lifted traces originally ran as this will help keep the FET physically in place while also acting as a jumper. In the following pic I have added a jumper wire to the bottom leg of the FET to recreate the second trace that was originally attached to this pad, and I also doubled up the middle lifted trace as a safety measure. Where that pad and trace were damaged already it's just good practice as you never know how long it will hold up in the game with heat and vibration.

    20130509_001346.jpg

    In this last pic I'm showing how I handled the top leg pad that got ruined. This leg of the FET is tied to the ground plane in the PCB, and even thought the bottom side of the pad was ruined, the top pad was still in tact, and still usable. In these instances you must solder the part from the top side of the PCB as the solder will not re-flow from the bottom through to the top as it normally should when the pad (and via) are in tact.

    20130509_001654.jpg

    And with that, this driver PCB repair is complete and ready to be re-installed in the game. :cool:
    (forgot to mention it's always good practice to ring out any and all repairs with your DMM to confirm there are no shorts and that your jumpers are good)

    D.
     
    #1
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2015
    WARLOCK likes this.
  2. WARLOCK

    WARLOCK Administrator
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    Re: #1 - Stern Austin Powers

    Thank you Menace! And very nice work I might add. My friend Owen will greatly appreciate his board fixed so that he can play his machine once again. He has played this pin literally for 3-4 years and done nothing to it. He didn't even take the glass off it to replace the balls ever, or even wax his machine. He did not know the translite should come out and he should replace the batteries once in a while. I have know Owen almost as long as I have known Walt, 19-20 years. I didn't even know he had a pinball until a year ago.

    Doug is kind in his words where he said it was a "nice gesture" to remove the broken part. The truth is, I got in a hurry and did
    NOT remove it as carefully as Doug had instructed me and taught me to do in the past. I was doing board work in a dark laundry room, on a freezer, with the light not working, with an LED flashlight in my mouth trying to carefully remove the broken part, and voila, near disaster.

    The veterans are correct. Board work (if you attempt it) needs to be done on your workbench when you have proper time and patience and lighting.

    The most important lesson learned was that I stopped (like Doug had told me to) when I knew I was in trouble, and hired a professional to do the job and fix it when I knew I was out of my league.

    I am sure later in the Menace files, some stories will pop up where other members didn't stop when they should have, and Doug then had even bigger problems to fix for them. I thank those members in advance for their errors, because it made me stop and think; and most importantly to cease trying to fix something and making it worse than it already was!

    Once again, with admiration and sincere appreciation, thank you Menace for a great repair, and sharing it with us.
     
    #2
  3. WARLOCK

    WARLOCK Administrator
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    Re: #1 - Stern Austin Powers

    So, work has been very busy. Owen (a good friend) who owns this Austin Powers, has been busy working as well.
    We work together several times a year on special events, and the last 2 weeks of our lives has been focused on
    the Anime North event in Toronto. Once it was complete, we both had time Thursday afternoon to fix AP finally.

    At Santiago's suggestion, I tested continuity on all of the wiring regarding our repair once again. It all checked out.
    Also at Doug's recommendation, I tested the (ohm) resistance across the coil again. I recall that Doug indicated it
    needed to be above 10 ohm's resistance. That checked out in the affirmative which meant there was no further
    damage done to the new coil that Brewmanager and I had previously installed.

    Time to put in the board that Doug had soldered and repaired. I picked the board up from Doug when we met up
    crossing path's on Mother's Day. Yes, I managed to escape the house and meet up with him. Trip duration and entire
    conversation with Doug (including drive time) 23 minutes.

    We installed the board and rewired it all up. Any connectors that Owen put together, I reseated and attached myself.
    Two of those were incorrect or not seated correctly, so I am glad I did this. Time to test power, and she booted up.

    I started a game, the game kicked a ball in the shooter lane and presto, we were in business. I tested all of the switches,
    and everything I could think of (on a game I am unfamiliar with) and everything seemed to be operating properly.

    We played one game of Austin Powers (my first) and it was fun. I can see why some people love it, and others don't.

    Because I am tired from work, my skills of articulation are somewhat lacking. I will leave it to Doug to finish off and add anything
    technical which needs mentioning, and pehaps even correct me if I mentioned anything that wasn't 100% correct.

    Thank you Menace for the assist and advice on the fix.

    My first newer Stern pin repair experience was complete.

    Case #1 closed on Warlock's end.
     
    #3

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